/* disable related videos */

Projects use this type of Treaty to secure the services of professional or semi-professional work.

A project cannot always afford lawyers, accountants, designers, marketers, engineers or such but would make this type of Treaty so that they can engage on an at risk or deferred basis.

Projects use this type of Treaty to engage a Mentor.

Mentors usually have “been there done that experience” or highly valuable specific knowledge that can help the Project get over the line.  This type of Treaty is often at risk and deferred and usually contains a mixture of financial and non-financial benefits for both the Project and the Mentor

Projects use this type of Treaty to secure the services of a Founder.

This helps establish expectations for both the Project and the Founder.  People who join the Project can see what’s in it for the Founder and can peg their own expectations against this pivotal relationship.  Often any payment(s) to the Founder established in this Treaty will be at-risk and deferred until the Project has sufficient monies.

Projects use this type of Treaty to establish expectations with Volunteers.

Volunteers are an important component of Co-ops and community enterprises.  Volunteers do not require financial reward, but may have other stipulations to their engagement.  This Treaty helps establish the expectations for both the Project and the Volunteer.